Jump to Content

Collaboration


Home  FAQ  Child and Family Sensitive Practice  |  Collaboration  |  Resources  |  About

Collaboration is “...characterised by strong and highly inter-dependent relationships which, by utilising multiple sources of expertise, knowledge and resources, focus on solving complex problems” (Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth, 2009).

A model for collaboration

Building Capacity, Building Bridges has adopted Winkworth and White’s model of collaboration. The model articulates a continuum of three levels of collaboration: networking, co-ordination and integration. Optimally the level of inter-agency collaboration is matched to client need.

There are three conditions for effective collaboration:

Public Value

Collaboration needs to have both a reason and a purpose that are sufficiently valued. For example: Having an account of the value of the enterprise to provide a shared reason for collaboration. Having a claim about why collaboration is necessary. Being able to identify mutual benefits to collaboration.

Authority

Collaboration needs an environment that authorises and supports the participants to give it legitimacy. For example: legislation or policy documents, agreements, information-sharing protocols, approval from non-government and other agencies as well as from representatives of government, and evidence from research and practice.

Capability

Collaboration must have access to resources and skills to be effective. For example: processes to facilitate information exchange, sufficient resources and infrastructure, relevant expertise, knowledge and skill.

Resources

Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth 2009, Advancing Collaboration Practice Fact Sheets 1, 2, & 3.

Winkworth, G & White, M. May Do, Should Do, Can Do: Collaboration Between Commonwealth and State Service Systems for Vulnerable Children, Communities, Children and Families Australia, Vol 5, No.1, May 2010.

Winkworth, G & White, M. (under review) Australia’s children “safe and well”: Aligning levels of collaboration and children’s vulnerability across Commonwealth Family Relationship and State Child Protection systems.

 

top^