Largest Australian software grant helps unlock careers for UniSA students

Siemens Business Development Director (Digital Enterprise) Hakan Ozcelik shows the company’s advanced Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) software to UniSA student UniSA first-year engineering student Franke Agenbag.

UniSA students will have access to the software used to design a Maserati, SpaceX rockets and the Mars Curiosity Rover through the largest software grant of its kind in Australia.

UniSA first-year engineering student Franke Agenbag got to try using the software, describing it as incredibly advanced. Franke hopes to work for the Royal Australian Air Force.UniSA first-year engineering student Franke Agenbag got to try using the software, describing it as incredibly advanced. Franke hopes to work for the Royal Australian Air Force.

Technology company Siemens is providing UniSA students with access to some of the most advanced software of its type – which can be used for 3D design, engineering collaboration, predictive engineering simulation and analytics – through a $450m in-kind gift.

The software grant is part of Siemens’ commitment to invest more than $1 billion in advanced  Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) software to select universities nationally. The aim is to ensure students develop the skills needed to successfully participate in what has been dubbed the fourth industrial revolution or Industry 4.0, a term used to describe the convergence of advanced automation, smart technologies and data in manufacturing.

UniSA Vice Chancellor Professor David Lloyd says the partnership with engineering giant Siemens Australia, will provide extraordinary opportunities for UniSA students and for local industry in the State.

“It’s exciting to think that our students will soon have access to the same software used to design and develop everything from Space X, the Mars Curiosity Rover, Maserati Ghibli and other world leading innovations such as the digital shipyard for Newport News (US) where aircraft carriers are built,” Professor Lloyd says.

“Not only will it give our students experience of an Industry 4.0 environment, it will also deliver huge benefits for manufacturing research at UniSA and, for the industry partners we work with every day, to support innovation and enterprise.

“Across defence, space, mining, the environment, and biomedical technology – it will allow us to model and prototype new ideas and give our students experience of advanced technology in the production of things, systems and processes.

xxxSiemens has announced Australia’s largest advanced software grant. The announcement was made at MOD. by Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne, South Australian Premier Steven Marshall, UniSA Vice Chancellor Professor David Lloyd, Siemens chairman and CEP Jeff Connolly and UniSA Deputy Vice Chancellor: Research and Innovation Professor Tanya Monro.

“This investment is really farsighted, and we are delighted to be working with Siemens to deliver graduates with the skills and knowledge to shape and transform industry in the future.”

Federal Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne says the software will help students learn the skills they needed to find jobs in the three massive shipbuilding projects soon to begin in South Australia.

“One of the most challenging aspects of growing a workforce at Osborne, which is around 1800 now to about 5500 in only six or seven years is finding the skilled people who are able to do the job,” Mr Pyne says.

“We need everybody from highly skilled carpenters and fitter and turners right through to naval architects, high skilled engineers and mathematicians. So this kind of software capability that students at the University of South Australia and others will have access to will give us a really big boost in terms of creation of the kinds of jobs that will be necessary at Osborne for submarine building and sustainment and maintenance as well as shipbuilding.”

The Advertiser, 7 June 2018.The Advertiser, 7 June 2018.

Siemens chairman and CEO Jeff Connolly says the grant – the only one awarded in South Australia – reflects Siemens long partnership with the state of South Australia and a commitment to working with great educational institutions to build the workforce of the future.

“I’m delighted to announce the grant of Siemens PLM advanced industrial software with a commercial value of $450 million to UniSA,” Connolly says.

“It demonstrates the great partnership we have with the state of South Australia and our commitment to working with great educational institutions to build the workforce of the future.”

South Australian Premier Steven Marshall says the skills will transfer across to all advanced manufacturing and set students up to lead the fourth industrial revolution.

“It is not just in the areas of shipbuilding. There are so many other applications for this type of software. We are particularly looking at opportunities around advanced manufacturing,” he says.

“The off-shore patrol vessels, the future frigates and the submarines will allow that technology transfer to other sectors of our economy – manufacturing, mining, agriculture. And this software platform, the 250 licenses in South Australia, enables our students to take on this economy.”

The grant is part of Siemens’ commitment of more than $1 billion in advanced PLM software grants to select universities nationally and will enable students and the University to develop the skills needed to successfully participate in the fourth industrial revolution (Industry 4.0).

It is linked to the recommendations and work of the Prime Minister’s Industry 4.0 Taskforce – an industry led group established to support improved bilateral relations between Australia and Germany.

The Siemens PLM software grant provides a suite of advanced PLM software and ensures UniSA will have access to the same advanced software, processes and best practices that are used to develop some of the most sophisticated global products and systems in industries including automotive, aerospace, shipbuilding, high-tech electronics and more.

top^