Take a look inside UniSA’s new future focused museum

You can now visit MOD. on the ground floor of UniSA’s Cancer Research Institute on North Terrace, next to Morphett Street Bridge. Admission is free. INSIDE UNISA
You can now visit MOD. on the ground floor of UniSA’s Cancer Research Institute on North Terrace, next to Morphett Street Bridge.
Admission is free.

One of the most ambitious new museums in the country has opened its doors to the public and is set to challenge everything people expect from the “museum” experience.

Seven News story on UniSA’s futuristic museum of discovery, MOD.Watch the Seven News story on UniSA’s futuristic museum of discovery, MOD.

The futuristic museum of discovery, MOD., is located in the UniSA Cancer Research Institute on North Terrace.

It is hoped that MOD. will give people aged 15-25 experiences that will change their perceptions of science, partly through a fusion with art, and has an ambitious target of 200,000 annual visitors within three to five years.

MOD. Director Dr Kristin Alford told The Advertiser the goals were to “change the culture of how we think about science”, while showcasing UniSA and other research.

Visiting the museum would also help to break down barriers for young people from families who had never been to university, she says.

The museum’s permanent centrepiece is a giant animated globe which at the touch of a screen transforms from the Earth into the sun, moon or any of the planets.

The giant globe in MOD.’s Universal Gallery changes at the touch of a button.The giant globe in MOD.’s Universal Gallery changes at the touch of a button.

The globe, known as Science On a Sphere (SOS), can show hundreds of other datasets including atmospheric storms, changes in sea levels and ocean temperatures, the migration paths of sea turtles, as well as light pollution, global navigation paths or marine migration all in real time.

MOD.’s first exhibition, MOD.IFY, promises to take audiences on an immersive and unexpected journey that will challenge what they think they know about what it means to be human. Visitors can explore artificial worlds and augmented realities, challenge perceptions of pain and injury, be part of stories about space and place and consider what makes them human versus animal or machine.

This was The Advertiser’s take on it:

One gallery devoted to the exploration of pain has chairs, left, that deliver light electric shocks to daring visitors under coloured lights and distracting pictures, showing how perception of pain changes under different conditions.

In another, a disarming animatronic head, modelled on an 18-year-old Adelaide boy, “wakes up” and speaks as visitors approach, posing questions about artificial intelligence and the differences between man and machine.

The most confronting exhibit is a series of lifelike, yet strangely enhanced, sculptures of babies, each with a feature designed to help it thrive under future conditions.

One has extra folds of skin on its head for faster heat dissipation, so it could grow up to work in high temperatures in a world hit by global warming.

MOD. imagesVisitors try the pain chair in the Feeling Human exhibit (left); “Josh” an animatronic head, and an example of “body modification” from the Transfigurations (by Agi Haines, UK) exhibit.

MOD. is open from midday to 6pm Tuesdays to Thursdays; from midday to 8pm Fridays; and from 10am to 4pm on weekends. Admission is free.

xxxThe introduction to the Our Sky exhibit; visitors can explore the solar system in the Universal Gallery; and the latest Augmented Reality art in the Prosthetic Reality exhibit.

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