Achievements and Announcements

ACHIEVEMENTS

Excellence in graduate research education recognised

UniSA student wins prestigious contemporary glass art award

UniTopia named most successful student focused event

Student film tops comedy category at SA Screen Awards

UniSA students recognised as Young Achievers

APPOINTMENTS

Cancer drug specialist to lead UniSA’s School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences

New deputy director appointed to Australian Centre for Child Protection

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Vale Emeritus Professor Kym Adey AM

Vale Dr Gregor Ramsey AM

UniSA graduates use passion for dance to develop their teaching expertise

Strengthening political, economic and trade relations with Korea


ACHIEVEMENTS

Excellence in graduate research education recognised

Professor Emily Hilder and Associate Professor Christine Garnaut were presented special commendations at the 2018 ACGR Awards for Excellence in Graduate Research Education in April.Professor Emily Hilder and Associate Professor Christine Garnaut were presented special commendations at the 2018 ACGR Awards for Excellence in Graduate Research Education in April.

The calibre of UniSA’s research education continues to shine as two of its top researchers – Professor Emily Hilder and Associate Professor Christine Garnaut – received special commendations at the Australian Council of Graduate Research’s 2018 Awards for Excellence in Graduate Research Education.

The national awards recognise individuals who exhibit outstanding performance in research degree supervision, leadership and industry engagement.

Director of the Future Industries Institute Professor Emily Hilder received a special commendation in the category Excellence in Promoting Industry Engagement in Graduate Research, an award presented to an individual who has initiated innovative and transformational engagement between candidates and partners.

“I really enjoy the opportunity to work with talented PhD candidates on challenges relevant to our industry partners,” Prof Hilder says.

“Supporting and helping our PhD students translate their research to new commercial products and processes, is an incredibly satisfying experience.

“This commendation is a real honour, and I’m most proud that it recognises the outstanding achievements of the many talented PhD students and colleagues with whom I’ve had the privilege to work.”

Director of the Architecture Museum in the School of Art, Architecture and Design Associate Professor Christine Garnaut, who’s also Director of the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute Research Centre, received a special commendation in the category Excellence in Graduate Research Leadership.

Presented to an individual who demonstrates inspirational and effective leadership in their local area, the award acknowledges Assoc Prof Garnaut’s 20-year contribution to the strategic development of research education at UniSA.

“I feel very honoured that my UniSA colleagues recognised me by nominating me for this leadership award,” Assoc Prof Garnaut says.

“Being able to foster and raise the profile of research education, and to contribute to the research training experience for HDR candidates in my school and division, is rewarding for me.

“I greatly enjoy and appreciate working with my PhD candidates and it’s exciting to watch them evolve and mature as researchers over the course of their candidature – and to be at their graduation to see them celebrating their successful completion with their family and friends.”

UniSA Dean of Graduate Studies Professor Pat Buckley says the awards continue to showcase UniSA’s remarkable researchers.

“The national awards were introduced last year and I am delighted to see, for the second year in a row, the University was well represented,” Prof Buckley says.

“Both Christine and Emily are exceptionally talented researchers and leaders who are dedicated to making a difference to research education.

“These commendations provide well-deserved recognition of their significant and sustained contributions in graduate research and training.”

More information about the 2018 ACGR Awards is available on the Australian Council of Graduate Research website.

UniSA student wins prestigious contemporary glass art award

Tom Moore’s winning piece, Pyrotechnic puffer fish.Tom Moore’s winning piece, Pyrotechnic puffer fish.

UniSA PhD candidate Tom Moore has been awarded the Tom Malone Prize, a highly respected honour for contemporary Australian glass artists.

Tom Moore’s Pyrotechnic puffer fish was selected from 13 shortlisted artists.

The prize includes $15,000. Tom’s winning work will join the State Art Collection at the Art Gallery of Western Australia.

Tom’s puffer fish goblets were created using 15th century Venetian glass blowing techniques and received high praise from the judges.

“We love it for its detail, its evidence of glass mastery, its straight-faced hilarity, dazzling technical spirit, and, above all, for seeming to come straight out of a dream as most of Tom’s creatures do,” the judges wrote.

Tom says the piece was inspired by a 16th century cabinet of curiosity in which white glass, such as the goblet bowls, were displayed alongside specimens of unicorn horn and puffer fish.

“I saw one of these puffer fish in a museum in Florence and could not get it out of my head – it seemed weirdly aware of its placement in the collection,” Tom says.

This is the second time Tom has won the prize, also taking the top honour in 2013. The judges noted that “with this award Tom is part of a truly elite group of Australian artists excelling in this most demanding of mediums”.

Tom’s success will take him to Venice where he will speak at the American Glass Art Society conference. After this he plans to return to Adelaide and finish his PhD thesis on the history of glass.

UniTopia named most successful student focused event

UniTopia features a Doggo Café, with dogs for people to pat and hug.UniTopia features a Doggo Café, with dogs for people to pat and hug.

UniSA’s student wellbeing event UniTopia has been named the most successful student focused event in a national competition.

UniTopia, a series of free events which take place each May and October, are co-presented by UniSA’s Student Association (USASA) and the Student Engagement Unit. UniTopia aims to increase student awareness of UniSA services, highlight the importance of mental health and wellbeing, provide activities which help relieve stress, while activating campus spaces to create a relaxing environment.

UniTopia was awarded Most Successful Event (student focused) at the recent CampusLink Awards. The awards are run by the Tertiary Access Group (TAG), a not-for-profit co-operative owned and run by its 70-plus member organisations including USASA.

USASA general manager Daniel Randell says the 2017 Student Diary also received an honourable mention in the Best Student Publication category, and USASA Manager: Events & Clubs Tracy Wellen received an honourable mention in the Best Newcomer Award category for her work to increase student engagement across all campuses.

Randell says UniTopia 2017 included a doggo café (free coffee, café seating and dogs to pat); a chance to adopt a seedling and nurture into a plant; a form of Pictionary encouraging students to express their thoughts in art; and a health check-up zone giving students a chance to talk to counsellors and other health professionals.

“Student feedback has been incredibly positive, with surveys of over 500 students revealing that 98 per cent of students are either highly satisfied or satisfied with UniTopia and 94 per cent of students rating the activities good or very good,” Randell says.

“Last year it’s estimated that we engaged with 4500 students across all six UniSA campuses.”

TAG’s 2018 Campuslink Awards were held in Melbourne on 8 May. UniTopia won against strong competition.

The annual awards recognise excellence in marketing, services, student programs and innovation in the tertiary sector.

UniTopia is being held at the Mawson Lakes campus on 15 May and at the Magill campus on 16 May.

 

Student film tops comedy category at SA Screen Awards

A short film featuring dozens of visual effects made by UniSA students has been named best comedy at the 2018 South Australian Screen Awards (SASA).

Lucy and DiC is a short comedy about a girl and her robot. It was directed by Jeremy Kelly-Bakker from Rising Sun Pictures and created by UniSA visual effects students.

UniSA and Rising Sun Pictures have partnered together to offer visual effects students industry-based training. Seventeen students completed more than 60 visual effects shots in three weeks as part of their Graduate Certificate in Compositing and Tracking and Graduate Certificate in Dynamic Effects and Lighting degrees. The students’ visual effects include an animated talking drone that stars in the film.

Media Arts Senior Lecturer Dr Josh McCarthy says the South Australian Screen Awards celebrate and promote the best screen works of the local film industry.

“SASA provides an exciting platform for South Australian screen practitioners to showcase their work across drama, comedy, documentary, animation, music video, non-narrative and digital media,” he says.

Lucy and DiC was nominated in five categories at the 2018 SASAs and won best comedy.

“This achievement not only highlights the outstanding quality of work produced within these programs, but also outlines the high level of professionalism and industry awareness they instil in our graduates,” Dr McCarthy says.

UniSA students recognised as Young Achievers

UniSA student Franke Agenbag receiving her award from Professor Peter Rathjen, Vice Chancellor and President of The University of Adelaide.UniSA student Franke Agenbag receiving her award from Professor Peter Rathjen, Vice Chancellor and President of The University of Adelaide.

UniSA students have been recognised for excellence in promoting female participation in science and mathematics; in sport; and for advocating human rights at the 2018 Young Achiever Awards.

Three students won Channel 9 Young Achiever Awards this month. The awards recognise outstanding achievements by young people.

UniSA Human Movement student and professional pole vaulter, Kurtis Marschall, won the Worldwide Printing Solutions Sports Award.

The 20-year-old was honoured for his outstanding contributions to sport as Australia’s junior pole vault record holder after competing in the 2016 Rio Olympics and winning gold at the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games.

Shamsiya Mohammadi with Loz and Thomo from Fresh 92.7 receiving her People’s Choice AwardShamsiya Mohammadi with Loz and Thomo from Fresh 92.7 receiving her People’s Choice Award.

Franke Agenbag, who is studying Electrical and Mechatronic Engineering at UniSA, won the STEM Award for her involvement in promoting female participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics through her local Zonta club.

UniSA Law and Journalism student and human rights advocate, Shamsiya Mohammadi – who is an Afghan refugee – was announced as the Fresh 92.7 People’s Choice Award winner on the night.

The awards aim to encourage nominees’ positive energies, talents and creativity, and to acknowledge and promote the achievements of all young people up to the age of 29.

More than 500 people attended the gala dinner presentation on Friday 11 May to celebrate the high achieving young people.


APPOINTMENTS

Cancer drug specialist to lead UniSA’s School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences

A leader in the pharmacology of drugs used to treat cancer has been appointed to head UniSA's School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences.

Professor Alan BoddyProfessor Alan Boddy will join the school in July to spearhead the University’s pharmaceutical and cancer research in the new University of South Australia Cancer Research Institute.

The new UniSA Cancer Research Institute on North Terrace will house the University’s cancer, drug discovery and therapeutics research facilities. Second and third-year Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science students will also be based there in purpose-built, state-of-the-art teaching spaces.

Prof Boddy says he is excited to be joining UniSA as his interests and experience in pharmacology, and specifically the understanding of how the pharmacology of cancer drugs influences treatment outcomes, closely intertwine with UniSA’s innovative research and education principles.

“I have always believed that good teaching is supported by good research practices and that teaching and research work best in a collaborative approach,” Prof Boddy says.

“I have used my research experience in the development and coordination of novel teaching modules in pharmacology and oncology, at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels and my research interests and experience are closely aligned with those of the School and of the wider faculty.”

Prof Boddy brings a wealth of knowledge to UniSA. He has been Professor of Cancer Therapeutics and Personalised Medicine in the University of Sydney’s Faculty of Pharmacy since 2014. He holds a Bachelor of Science (Honours) Pharmacy and a PhD in Pharmacokinetics, both from the University of Manchester.

Pro Vice Chancellor of UniSA’s Division of Health Sciences Professor Robert Vink says he is delighted to welcome Prof Boddy to the leadership position.

“This is a really important time for the School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences as it settles into purpose-built laboratories and teaching facilities in the UniSA Cancer Research Institute in Adelaide’s BioMed City and with increased focus on cancer research – Prof Boddy’s experience, knowledge and skills across research and teaching make him ideally suited to lead and build on the School’s strong track record,” Prof Vink says.

“Prof Boddy’s research focuses on the pharmacology of drugs used to treat cancer, spanning multiple aspects of cancer pharmacology, including drug analysis, pharmacogenetics, biomarkers and pharmacodynamics.

“He has attracted grant income, undertaken multiple collaborative projects, supervised students and published strongly in these areas over a number of years.

“Prof Boddy has also undertaken teaching in both Australia and the UK, with a strong focus on student engagement and the complementary relationship between teaching and research.”

Prof Boddy will take up his position in July.

Prof Vink also thanked the previous Head of School, Professor Jason White, for his leadership and achievements across seven years in the role.

New deputy director appointed to Australian Centre for Child Protection

Associate Professor Tim Moore Associate Professor Tim Moore has joined the leadership team at The Australian Centre for Child Protection (ACCP) at UniSA as Deputy Director and Head of Practice Solutions, strengthening the Centre’s position as Australia’s premier research centre looking at child abuse and neglect.

Assoc Prof Moore, an internationally recognised child and youth researcher and children’s rights advocate, moved into academia after working directly with children, young people and families.

“I wanted to better understand children’s lives and the best ways to support them and their families during periods of adversity,” Assoc Prof Moore says.

“I have focused on research underpinned by a commitment to promoting the needs, views and experiences of children and young people and supporting the development of practices, policies and programs that respond to them.”

His work includes collaborating directly with children and young people in participatory research projects across issues such as homelessness, youth justice, child protection, residential care, young carers, and child sexual abuse prevention.

Assoc Prof Moore has also provided advice to several inquiries and Commissions including research for the recent Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, as well as producing local, national and international initiatives that aim to improve the lives of children, young people and their families.

His appointment broadens the expertise of the leadership at ACCP, which also recently moved to a co-directorship structure with internationally renowned child protection experts Prof Fiona Arney and Prof Leah Bromfield at the helm.

Professors Arney and Bromfield are leaders in the field of child abuse and neglect, developing important research findings for the sector and directly impacting policy and practice, as well as providing advice and leadership to the sector nationally, through strategic advisory and leadership roles.

UniSA Deputy Vice Chancellor: Research, Professor Tanya Monro says that the ACCP’s new leadership team will further expand the work and influence of the Centre nationally and internationally.“Tim’s appointment to the Centre and the new Co-Directorship model with child protection experts Prof Arney and Prof Bromfield, means the Centre can further build and grow its ground-breaking work to continue to develop the much-needed evidence-base in this critical area and support its translation and implementation into policy and practice.”


ANNOUNCEMENTS

Vale Emeritus Professor Kym Adey AM

By Emeritus Professor Michael Rowan, former Pro Vice Chancellor Education Arts and Social Sciences

Emeritus Professor Kym Adey AMThe University community is mourning the death of Emeritus Professor Kym Adey AM.

Kym was a softly spoken, thoughtful man, who generously shared his expertise with all who sought his guidance. Widely respected, he took pleasure in assisting many in the development of their careers.

Kym’s own career began as a teacher and ended as UniSA’s Pro Vice Chancellor, Access and Learning Support. Through his many roles in the University and externally, notably as President of the Australian Council of Deans of Education, Chair of the Academic Board of Le Cordon Bleu, and a valued member of numerous higher education quality assurance and external review panels, Kym promoted respect for the profession of teaching. He encouraged a practice of teaching that was reflective, keen to learn from colleagues, internationally focused and research based, and this was the foundation of his own work as an educator.

Kym had many sides to his character, including being a meticulous woodworker. His family and friends were delighted when in retirement he turned his hand to sculpture, crafting lively works that are animated by of the joy of life. Kym’s keen eye for beauty and attention to detail in his work ensured that many appreciated the quality of his creations.

A conversation with Kym was always warm and rewarding. While our thoughts are firstly with Kym’s wife Sandy and their daughters, we will all miss him deeply.

In 2011, Prof Adey started the Kym Adey Catherine House UniSA Scholarship using funds from sales of a limited-edition series of sculptures he made. Catherine House is a charity which supports women experiencing homelessness. His scholarship provides financial support to women from Catherine House to undertake further education at UniSA or UniSA College. Prof Adey was also recognised as a member of The Hetzel Group, which acknowledges and celebrates the contribution of individuals who make philanthropic gifts totalling $100,000 or more to UniSA. Donations can be made in support of the Kym Adey Catherine House UniSA Scholarship at https://donate.unisa.edu.au/donate-named-scholarships.

Vale Dr Gregor Ramsey AM

Dr Gregor Ramsey AMA passionate advocate for curriculum development and Aboriginal education who played a pivotal role in the establishment of one of the key organisations that preceded UniSA, Dr Gregor Ramsey AM, died this month.

Dr Ramsey began his career as a science teacher in South Australia and accrued more than 40 years’ experience in the educational profession, during which time he also co-authored a range of textbooks and journal articles.

In the early 1980s, Dr Ramsey played a central role in the merger of six colleges of advanced education in Adelaide. The result of this merger was the South Australian College of Advanced Education – of which Dr Ramsey was principal – now part of UniSA.

Dr Ramsey subsequently held a number of senior federal and state government positions in education and training, including chair of the Higher Education Council and the National Board of Employment, Education and Training. These roles culminated in the position of managing director of the New South Wales TAFE Commission.

In 2000 he completed a review of teacher education in NSW that had significant national impact on teacher preparation and teaching, and in 2003 led a team to review secondary education in the Northern Territory. The report of that initiative, Building Better Schools, provided a model for educational change across Australia.

Between 2001 and 2003, Dr Ramsey was project director for the Desert Peoples Centre in Alice Springs, and worked to provide improved education and services to the Aboriginal people of central Australia.

Dr Ramsey was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by UniSA in 2005. He was made a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in 2007 for his service to education.

Dr Ramsey was an advocate for the arts and arts education and continued his association with the University as president of the Friends of the South Australian School of Art (2013 – 2016).

UniSA International Support Officer Denice Daou, who worked closely with Dr Ramsey through the Friends of the South Australian School of Art, said he would be sorely missed.

 

UniSA graduates use passion for dance to develop their teaching expertise

Emma, Nikki, Cassandra (top left, centre front and back) networking with teachers from around the world at the 2015 Joint Dance Congress in Copenhagen, Denmark.Emma, Nikki, Cassandra (top left, centre front and back) networking with teachers from around the world at the 2015 Joint Dance Congress in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Three UniSA graduates who teach primary school students dance, are mentoring fellow teachers as part of an upcoming world dance congress that will be held in Adelaide later this year.

Bachelor of Early Childhood Education graduates Cassandra Giannone, Nikki Caputo and Emma Warmington, are mentors for the upcoming 2018 Joint Dance Congress, Panpapanpalya.

Panpapanpalya will be one of the world’s largest gatherings of dancers, dance educators and artists of all ages.

The three graduates are sharing their knowledge and experience from participating in the 2015 Dance and the Child International congress held in Copenhagen, where they were youth facilitators.

Giannone says she has improved as a teacher because of her participation in the earlier congress and it gave her leadership, project management and presentation skills that helped her win her teaching job.

“I gained so much experience networking with professionals in the field of dance education and developed relationships which are still useful in my practice today,” she says.

Caputo says her experiences have allowed her “to pass on my passion and enthusiasm for dance to my students”.

The group will mentor and support youth facilitators at Panpapanpalya 2018, including peers from Melbourne, Auckland and Toronto.

Cassandra Giannone at the 2015 Joint Dance Congress in Copenhagen, Denmark.Cassandra Giannone at the 2015 Joint Dance Congress in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Now located in Adelaide, Port Pirie and Ceduna, Giannone, Caputo and Warmington are raising funds for the Ugandan Peace Africa Children’s Ensemble to attend the congress.

Giannone says visiting Adelaide will give the students a once in a lifetime opportunity.

“They will learn from teachers and students from all around the world, as well as share their culture and passion through dance,” she says. “Dance is one of the strongest forms of communication and that was evident when we saw children who couldn’t speak to each other due to language barriers but could dance and laugh together.”

The graduates have raised $17,000 of their $20,000 target through community events.

The 2018 Joint Dance Congress will be hosted by UniSA at the City West campus from 8-13 July.

Strengthening political, economic and trade relations with Korea

Vice Chancellor Professor David Lloyd, symposium co-organiser and Senior Lecturer at the Asia Institute of the University of Melbourne Dr Jay Song, UniSA Pro Vice Chancellor (Business and Law) Professor Marie Wilson, Trade Minister David Ridgway, Minister and Consul-General Republic of Korea to Australia Jin-Weon Chae, co-organiser of the Symposium and Director of the King Sejong Institute Adelaide Professor You-il Lee, Head of UniSA’s School of Management Professor Ruth Rentschler, and Governor of South Australia Hieu Van Le AC.Vice Chancellor Professor David Lloyd, symposium co-organiser and Senior Lecturer at the Asia Institute of the University of Melbourne Dr Jay Song, UniSA Pro Vice Chancellor (Business and Law) Professor Marie Wilson, Trade Minister David Ridgway, Minister and Consul-General Republic of Korea to Australia Jin-Weon Chae, co-organiser of the Symposium and Director of the King Sejong Institute Adelaide Professor You-il Lee, Head of UniSA’s School of Management Professor Ruth Rentschler, and Governor of South Australia Hieu Van Le AC.

Experts in Australia-Korea relations recently came together for an event in Adelaide aimed at strengthening ties between the two countries.

UniSA hosted the symposium on Australia-Korea relations in April.

UniSA Associate Professor of International Business, and Director of King Sejong Institute Adelaide, You-il Lee, says Korea is Australia’s fourth largest export market, but the importance of the relationship is not widely known.

“It’s one of six countries that matter the most to Australia (along with China, India, Indonesia, Japan and the United States),” Assoc Prof Lee says.

“Yet while Australia’s political and economic relationship with Korea continues to grow, public awareness of the importance of the Australia-Korea relationship is underwhelming.”

He says that while the demand for a better understanding of Korea has significantly increased in South Australia over the past decade, it has not been matched by a sufficient supply of Korean Studies related programs, which is concerning, given the importance of Korea to Australia.

“First steps have been made to improve awareness and engagement with Korea, with the first and only Australian King Sejong Institute established at UniSA in 2016,” he says.

“The King Sejong Institute is a hub for Korean culture, business and language education—and as the one and only university across Australasia to be granted this right by the Korean Government, it is testament to our commitment to the Australia-Korea relationship.”

The institute has a focus on supporting South Australian companies and the public to do business in Korea.

Former Foreign Minister Gareth Evans was keynote speaker at the symposium. Evans provided insights into the Australia-Korea relationship, drawing on his experience in the international arena as a policymaker and politician.

The event was opened by South Australian Governor Hieu Van Le AC at an evening reception for participants. The symposium was held in partnership with the Academy of Korean Studies (Korean Government), the Australia-Korea Foundation, the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and the University of Melbourne.

“Given that Australia and South Australia intend to build a stronger and more comprehensive relationship with Asia, especially with our key regional partners which include Korea, it makes perfect sense for South Australia to prioritise our learning about Asia,” Assoc Prof Lee says.

Upcoming events include a King Sejong Institute academy later in the year, supported by the Korean Government, which will include everything from K-Pop and food to fashion.

See more pictures from the event here.

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